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Vancouver WA Family Law Blog

Popular rapper and actor seeks child support change

Popular rapper and Fast & Furious star, Ludacris, was recently ordered to pay the mother of his newborn child $7,000 a month in child support. The rapper, also known as Chris Bridges, filed court documents to establish paternity and have his child support reduced. The rapper argued that, due to the unexpected death of a Fast & Furious co-star, which halted the film's production, his earnings were about $25,000 a month and he could only afford $1,800 a month in child support.

Additionally, the rapper has not released a solo album in four years and there are reports that the release of his latest album has been pushed back after his newest single performed poorly. The mother of the 4-month old received full custody of the child and the rapper was ordered to pay a $7,000 monthly payment, $35,000 in back child support and the woman's attorney's fees. Child support modifications may be possible based on a variety of factors, including a change in income of the non-custodial parent.

Pop singer Richard Marx announces divorce

Washington music fans may remember listening to Richard Marx's ballads on the radio in the 1980s and 1990s. But even his sweet love songs could not hold his marriage together. Marx and his wife of 25 years recently announced that they were filing for divorce.

The 50-year-old singer and his actress wife, Cynthia Rhodes, age 57, filed for legal separation in July and are now divorcing. The two met in 1983 when Rhodes and Marx worked together on the movie "Staying Alive." They married in 1989 and have three adult sons.

Going through divorce? Keep social media out of it

Many Washington residents use Facebook and Twitter and various other social media forums to stay in touch with friends and family. But when the divorce papers have been filed, it's best to stay away from these social media sites - or at least refrain from posting anything. It may not seem apparent at first but even the smallest thing can be used against someone in a divorce - especially a tweet or Facebook post.

It's well known that a divorce can stir up many emotions and stress, but it's best not to rant about these feelings online. Even if a person blocks out an ex-spouse and all of his or her friends, the posts can still be viewed. The Internet is simply not private. People get creative and an ex-spouse can view posts under a friend's account or create a new account. It can even be as easy as logging into the other party's account, if he or she knows the username and password, which married couples may share.

Going through divorce? Keep social media out of it

Many Washington residents use Facebook and Twitter to stay in touch with friends and family. But when the divorce papers have been filed, it's best to stay away from these social media sites - or at least refrain from posting anything. Why? The smallest thing can be used against someone in a divorce - even a tweet or Facebook post.

Although a divorce often involves emotions and stress, it's best not to rant on Facebook or Twitter. Even if a person blocks out an ex-spouse and all of his or her friends, the posts can still be viewed. The ex can view posts under a friend's account or create a new account. It can even be as easy as logging into the other party's account, if he or she knows the username and password.

Think cohabitation leads to divorce? Study says think again

Many Washington couples may have decided to forego living together before marriage because of all the studies that seem to conclude that cohabitation increases the risk of divorce. However, new research is showing that living together before the wedding day actually has very little to do with the marriage breaking up. There is no difference in the divorce rate of those who moved in together before marriage and those who waited until after marriage, which is good news for the more than 60 percent of couples who cohabitate.

Previous research was done using the ages of those who moved in together, but the recent research - performed by a sociologist - instead used the date the couples moved in together. Her theory was that the couples assumed the roles of husband and wife once they moved in together, even though they were not legally married. By using this method, she saw no difference in the divorce rate.

Man faces domestic violence charges after setting fire to ex

When a relationship ends, the results can be emotionally and physically painful. A Yakima woman's health is improving after her ex-boyfriend caught her on fire and caused second-degree burns. The man now faces charges of domestic violence and arson.

The woman suffered serious injuries after she was burned in her apartment on March 6. Her ex-boyfriend ignited the flames after dousing her body with a chemical. Her roommate heard her screams for help and was able to knock down a door and get medical assistance.

Failure to pay child support could land R. Kelly in jail

Seattle fans of R. Kelly may have seen the R&B star in the news again lately. However, it's not for a concert or upcoming album. It's for failing to pay child support. Kelly - who also failed to appear in court in November - could be facing jail time if he doesn't address this situation and at least show up for his March 27 court date.

Kelly is obligated to pay more than $20,000 a month in child support for his three children with his ex-wife. In 2013, he racked up about $100,000 in owed child support, but paid off his debt. If he doesn't show up for his next court appearance, he is possibly looking at up to six months in jail. Kelly's own lawyers have been unable to contact him and may be forced to drop him as a client.

Can an app ease the pain of a divorce?

Many Washington couples may seek the help of a professional counselor when dealing with a difficult marriage. But why pay someone $100 an hour when it's easier and cheaper to download an app that can help couples navigate through a divorce? There are numerous apps available that help couples split assets, talk to their children about divorce and schedule visitations.

Apps can help people do so much, from scheduling meetings to managing household budgets to diagnosing common ailments. But experts warn that their value is limited when it comes to offering relationship advice. Each relationship comes with its own complexities; no two are the same. So how can an app possibly help couples through a divorce - probably one of the most stressful times of their life?

Man faces domestic violence charges for abusing pregnant woman

Alcohol can cause a person's judgment to become impaired. Unfortunately, that was the case for a couple in Yelm, an hour outside Seattle. The couple had been drinking and allegedly got into a physical altercation after the man learned that the woman - who was six months pregnant - was using drugs. The man was arrested and now faces domestic violence and harassment charges

The incident happened on the evening of February 13. Police deputies arrived at a residence and found the couple arguing. The woman said the 53-year-old man punched and kicked her in the stomach and attempted to strangle her. The man said the woman used a frying pan to hit him in the head, but the woman claims it was done in self-defense.

Social Security and Work

Very few people who receive Social Security disability benefits return to work, but this has nothing to do with disability recipients' desire to work. It has everything to do with the fact that the disability criteria are stringent. These people suffer from severe medical impairments, including chronic illnesses and debilitating injuries which have left them without the capacity to perform substantial work (with or without accommodations afforded by the Americans with Disabilities Act). More than six in 10 applicants for disability benefits never receive them because the legal standard is so strict.

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